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Certain HIV positive, but negative tests (Page 125)

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October 17th, 2015
Experienced User
Also, TonyDewitt: have you tried any HIV drug ? I guess TAF should be available soon.
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replied October 31st, 2015
Experienced User
I think I will make it end, one day. I can't see any hope. I'm doing everything I can but I have a lot of issues with my legs and spine. Can't see a bright future in my life.
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replied October 31st, 2015
Active User, very eHealthy
Dont u say that. Father said if at first u dont succeed, try, try n try again, like edison. Easier said tjan done, but othrs have done it, right. Tried alternatives like sand therapy to help, those chlorella n green grasses too?!
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replied October 31st, 2015
Experienced User
Thursday, October 29, 2015

NIH takes action to bolster research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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The National Institutes of Health is strengthening its efforts to advance research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), a disease for which an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment have remained elusive. The actions being taken include launching a research protocol at the NIH Clinical Center to intensely study individuals with ME/CFS and re-invigorating the efforts of the long-standing Trans-NIH ME/CFS Research Working Group with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) as the lead of a multi-institute research effort.

“Of the many mysterious human illnesses that science has yet to unravel, ME/CFS has proven to be one of the most challenging,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “I am hopeful that renewed research focus will lead us toward identifying the cause of this perplexing and debilitating disease so that new prevention and treatment strategies can be developed.”

NIH’s direction on the disease is being guided by a recent Institute of Medicine report (link is external), that recommended new diagnostic criteria and a new name for the disease (Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease), and an NIH-sponsored Pathways to Prevention meeting that generated a position paper and report with recommendations for research strategies.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ME/CFS is estimated to affect more than 1 million Americans, and has been reported in people younger than 10 years of age and older than age 70. ME/CFS is an acquired, chronic multi-system disease characterized by systemic exertion intolerance, resulting in significant relapse after exertion of any sort. The disease includes immune, neurological and cognitive impairment; sleep abnormalities; and dysfunction of the autonomic system, which controls several basic bodily functions. These symptoms result in significant functional impairment accompanied by profound fatigue. Additional symptoms may include widespread muscle and joint pain, sore throat, tender lymph nodes and headaches. Effects of the illness can range from moderate to debilitating, with at least one-quarter of individuals with ME/CFS being bedbound or housebound at some point in the illness and many individuals never regaining their pre-disease level of functioning. Because the pathology of ME/CFS remains unknown and there is no test to diagnose the disease, studies to date have used different criteria for diagnosis, which has limited the ability to compare results across studies. Additionally, many of the published studies are based on small study populations and have not been replicated.

In an effort to remedy this situation, NIH will design a clinical study in the NIH Clinical Center with plans to enroll individuals who developed fatigue following a rapid onset of symptoms suggestive of an acute infection. The study will involve researchers from NINDS, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The primary objective of the study is to explore the clinical and biological characteristics of ME/CFS following a probable infection to improve understanding of the disease’s cause and progression.

NIH will also be considering additional ways to support ME/CFS research in the extramural research community. Since the root cause of ME/CFS is unknown and the manifestations of the disorder cut across the science interests of multiple NIH institutes and centers, a trans-NIH working group will be needed to assist that plan. NINDS Director Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., will chair the Working Group along with Vicky Holets Whittemore, Ph.D., the NIH representative to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee. One goal of the group will be to explore how new technologies might shed light on what causes ME/CFS. The Working Group includes representation from 23 NIH institutes, centers and offices.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.
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replied October 31st, 2015
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Thursday, October 29, 2015

NIH takes action to bolster research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Share on print Share on email Share on facebook Share on twitter
The National Institutes of Health is strengthening its efforts to advance research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), a disease for which an accurate diagnosis and effective treatment have remained elusive. The actions being taken include launching a research protocol at the NIH Clinical Center to intensely study individuals with ME/CFS and re-invigorating the efforts of the long-standing Trans-NIH ME/CFS Research Working Group with the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) as the lead of a multi-institute research effort.

“Of the many mysterious human illnesses that science has yet to unravel, ME/CFS has proven to be one of the most challenging,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “I am hopeful that renewed research focus will lead us toward identifying the cause of this perplexing and debilitating disease so that new prevention and treatment strategies can be developed.”

NIH’s direction on the disease is being guided by a recent Institute of Medicine report (link is external), that recommended new diagnostic criteria and a new name for the disease (Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease), and an NIH-sponsored Pathways to Prevention meeting that generated a position paper and report with recommendations for research strategies.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ME/CFS is estimated to affect more than 1 million Americans, and has been reported in people younger than 10 years of age and older than age 70. ME/CFS is an acquired, chronic multi-system disease characterized by systemic exertion intolerance, resulting in significant relapse after exertion of any sort. The disease includes immune, neurological and cognitive impairment; sleep abnormalities; and dysfunction of the autonomic system, which controls several basic bodily functions. These symptoms result in significant functional impairment accompanied by profound fatigue. Additional symptoms may include widespread muscle and joint pain, sore throat, tender lymph nodes and headaches. Effects of the illness can range from moderate to debilitating, with at least one-quarter of individuals with ME/CFS being bedbound or housebound at some point in the illness and many individuals never regaining their pre-disease level of functioning. Because the pathology of ME/CFS remains unknown and there is no test to diagnose the disease, studies to date have used different criteria for diagnosis, which has limited the ability to compare results across studies. Additionally, many of the published studies are based on small study populations and have not been replicated.

In an effort to remedy this situation, NIH will design a clinical study in the NIH Clinical Center with plans to enroll individuals who developed fatigue following a rapid onset of symptoms suggestive of an acute infection. The study will involve researchers from NINDS, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Nursing Research and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The primary objective of the study is to explore the clinical and biological characteristics of ME/CFS following a probable infection to improve understanding of the disease’s cause and progression.

NIH will also be considering additional ways to support ME/CFS research in the extramural research community. Since the root cause of ME/CFS is unknown and the manifestations of the disorder cut across the science interests of multiple NIH institutes and centers, a trans-NIH working group will be needed to assist that plan. NINDS Director Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., will chair the Working Group along with Vicky Holets Whittemore, Ph.D., the NIH representative to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Advisory Committee. One goal of the group will be to explore how new technologies might shed light on what causes ME/CFS. The Working Group includes representation from 23 NIH institutes, centers and offices.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.
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replied November 2nd, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
I got a rash on my back (shingles) from reactivated chickenpox virus, so the doctor prescribed me famciclovir, an antiviral. After taking the medication, I now feel better in terms of being able to get up, move, have less pain. This proves that our problem is a virus, and you already know the virus I am referring to.

Best wishes.
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replied November 2nd, 2015
Active User, very eHealthy
I was with a group discussing once, and it was said some of the best helps for shingles is olive leaf extract, and lysine supplementation. Maybe u have recovered, but just saying. I didn't know that when some family had shingles.
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replied November 3rd, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
S,

Thank you - I have already been taking both Lysine and Olive Leaf tablets for HTLV, I appreciate your suggestion. However, I am excited that the Famciclovir has helped my HTLV.

Best wishes.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Active User, very eHealthy
Oh is that so... mind if i ask for how long> i'm trying to look for olive leaf oil. where do u order? tnx.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
S,

I got mine from VitaminShoppe - they have a web site. They smell great!

Best wishes.
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replied November 6th, 2015
Experienced User
hi guys,

I felt very weak on my legs today.

I went to the pharmacy and got Acyclovir (i.e. Valtrex, antiviral for HSV-2) and they were nice - I didn't have a prescription but was allowed to buy it anyways. Will let you know if I get better. I hope so.
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replied November 6th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
J,

Since Acyclovir & Famciclovir are in the same family, you will see improvement in your symptoms, as I did. Unfortunately, today is the last day of my prescription.

Best wishes.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Experienced User
TD,

thanks. Are you planning to keep taking antivirals ?

I've not seen major improvements so far; I'm taking around 2.5 g of Acyclovir per day. will see what happens this coming week.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Experienced User
Whatever this thing is - I guess some HTLV / MS virus - , I'm realizing it is slowly killing me.

Actually, it probably won't kill me, but will make me live a miserable life.

I read some new remyelinating drugs will soon be available… hope they will work for us, too.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Experienced User
Whatever this thing is - I guess some HTLV / MS virus - , I'm realizing it is slowly killing me.

Actually, it probably won't kill me, but will make me live a miserable life.

I read some new remyelinating drugs will soon be available… hope they will work for us, too.
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replied November 8th, 2015
Experienced User
Paradox in my life:

- I can count my sexual partners on my fingers, I don't even get to completely use one hand; never had risky behaviors; never did drugs; don't even smoke; no car accidents; But… I'm getting paralyzed.
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replied November 9th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
J,

Yes, I have that "I had a good life" conversation at least once a week. No drugs, minimal drinking, tried to stay "clean". Now with this, all of that good work seems out of the window. Please try to fight this thing, if we all fall down and die, no one will be able to learn from our suffering, and perhaps beat this thing someday.

Best wishes.
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Users who thank TonyDewitt for this post: jammy88 

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replied November 10th, 2015
Experienced User
Hi guys,

I hope this post finds you well.

There's some good news for the all of us, I think. Remember Bioniz (biotech company located in Irvine, CA)? They're working on something exciting, entering the Investigational Phase next year. Meanwhile, my plan is to get neurological / autoimmune treatment to preserve my neuro function (I'm getting slightly worse and I read of some people who recovered their function with early treatment) .
Please read what follows:

The Effectiveness of Bioniz’s Core BNZ Drug Platform Technology Unveiled Across Publications in Top Journals JBC and PNAS

08:00 EDT 6 Oct 2015 | PR Web
Home Topics Top 50 Biopharma Products 2011 Latest News The Effectiveness of Bioniz’s Core BNZ Drug Platform Technology Unveiled Across Publications in Top Journals JBC and PNAS
Studies proving the mechanism of the core technology of Bioniz, an emerging biopharmaceutical company, confirmed multiple cytokine inhibition with a small peptide last month in two peer-reviewed publications. The outcome of the studies proved Bioniz’s assertion that their platform could create single peptides that inhibit multiple cytokines with different target specificity.

Irvine, CA (PRWEB) October 06, 2015

Related Biotechnology, Pharmaceutical and Healthcare News
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Bioniz, a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of first-in-class multiple-cytokine inhibitory therapeutics to address immunoinflammatory diseases and cancer immune-therapy, announced today its first two scientific publications in the prestigious peer-reviewed journals JBC and PNAS.

“These publications validate how Bioniz’s novel technology effectively selects and targets biologically redundant cytokines, an unprecedented functionality, which we believe will lead to the creation of a new and major class of drugs that comprehensively address the multiple drivers characteristic of immune system diseases,” said Nazli Azimi, CEO of Bioniz and co-inventor of the technology.
“The issue of cytokine redundancy has been an obstacle to the development of effective anti-cytokine therapies. The current therapeutic approaches have been limited either to single monoclonal antibody (MAB) therapies against individual cytokines or to the use of JAK inhibitors that too broadly and non-exclusively block the downstream signaling components that follow cytokine activation. Humira, the monoclonal antibody set to eclipse Lipitor as the largest drug of all time, exemplifies the vast market potential of cytokine modulation. Even though Humira targets only one cytokine and is not highly specific to many of the disease states that have adopted it, it has still shown tremendous success for patients and created incredible market value. We hope to contribute such value many fold.”

JBC: Bioniz scientists and collaborators demonstrated in the JBC (J Biol Chem. 2015 Sep 11;290(37):22338-51) a proprietary design algorithm by which specific peptide molecules may be created that each selectively inhibit multiple cytokines with overlapping functions, and that act without compromising the broader cytokine family. More specifically, they demonstrated that BNZ132-1, a peptide that selectively inhibits IL-2, IL-9, and IL-15, has in vitro and in vivo efficacy comparable with combinatorial MABs against each cytokine.

PNAS: The second publication in PNAS (PNAS September 1, 2015 vol. 112no. 35 11030-11035 ) details extensive studies conducted at a leading laboratory for neuro-inflammatory diseases at the NIH. The manuscript details the positive results of BNZ132-1, and its conjugated form, BNZ132-1-40, on modulation of the hyper-immune activity in HAM/TSP patients. HAM/TSP is an underserved and orphan status neuro- inflammatory disease with an MS-like clinical progression. This research sets the stage for Bioniz’s first Investigational New Drug Application, expected to be filed in 2016.

“We are very pleased with our progress and the fact that our collaborators have validated and acknowledged the potential of our technology”
said Dr. Azimi. “These publications coincide with Company’s series A financing to initiate our clinical programs in orphan diseases. We are confident that with the robustness in our platform and rapid advancement of our pipeline, we will continue to generate significant value for our investors.”
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replied November 13th, 2015
Experienced User
Hello everyone, i hope life is treating you well. I did not get get the chance to read all the threads because of work, but i just want to let you guys know what is happening to me these last days.

As you know, i am over four (4) years with this illness and still can't figure out what it is.

These days i am feeling pain in my left foot. If i stand for long, the soul of my foot hurts. A few weeks ago, my calf area was hurting badly but that has stopped now. My stool is in pebble from and black. A little abdominal pain at times. My main problem now is upset stomach. I had to go to the doctor two time the other day. Ultrasound was done that shows that my stomach is ok. I am still having the stomach problem but its not as bad as before. I am afraid to eat these days because whenever i eat, i feel like bringing it up. I remember my mouth run water for almost 4 days.

I am not losing weight so i am puzzled to what this is. My leg pain coincides with HTLV.
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replied November 16th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
Hello Ustas,

Good to hear from you after so long, like you I just passed my 4 year anniversary of this disease. I sympathize with your suffering, have you tried any of the following: Curcumin, Lysine, Pau D'Arco, Olive Leaf, Licorice Root, Skullcap, Green Tea tablets? I would say the the Curcumin is the most important of these.

Best wishes.
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replied November 17th, 2015
Active User, very eHealthy
i only know curcumin (from turmeric) is in. whats ur dosage? even for RA, other conditions.. olive leaf extract also.
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replied November 17th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
When the pain was really bad, I was doing daily 2,000 mg of curcumin / turmeric, but currently I am only doing 500 mg daily. Also 500 mg for the olive leaf. I would go heavier on the curcumin, but it is expensive. The best price is buying in quantity at turmeric-curcumin dot com, at $300 you get 12 bottles, which is about 4 times cheaper than in the stores.

Best wishes.
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replied November 17th, 2015
Active User, very eHealthy
Tnx. ow abt banyanbotanicals..theyre for cooking, but we also do make fresh teas using powder like this.
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replied November 18th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
I haven't tried that, but please let me know if it works for you. I'm trying to use the supplements that are tied to published medical journal research.

Best wishes.
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replied November 18th, 2015
Experienced User
Hello guys,

3rd week on Valacyclovir and apparently I'm getting a bit better. Will keep you posted. Don't know if this can stay like that. Hopefully.
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replied November 20th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
Yesterday was the day! I started my one month trial of Truvada! I feel great, and hope that I continue to do so, and that I pass the toxicity tests after a month! Please keep your fingers crossed for me. Also, please consider telling your doctor that you are involved with someone HIV positive so that you can start taking Truvada also.

Best wishes!
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replied November 20th, 2015
Experienced User
Sounds great my friend !! Congratulations!!!

Did your symptoms improve ? Smile

I'm planning to keep staying on Valacyclovir, then I'll see what to do in the future.

Please keep us posted!

Thank u,

J
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replied December 5th, 2015
Experienced User
Hello all - been a while - I just passed 3 years. Mostly ok - just minor items now. Skin issues, eye inflammation, headaches, etc

Tony I read your post about truvda and while it may be helpful I am concerned you are not doing haart treatment. It might be good for a bit but then without the multiple drugs, the virus could adapt and then you are worse off.

Has anyone got a DNA/RNA test for HIV? I did at 6 weeks but when it was negative and my other 9 tests were negative out to 2.3 years - I stopped

But as tony is trying HIV drugs - we all are gravitating back to the original concern.

My thoughts are with everyone -
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replied December 7th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
WS,

Thank you for checking in. While I appreciate your concerns, we are NOT gravitating to the original concern, NONE of us have HIV! We have all been tested numerous times, me personally at least 20 times. This is a DIFFERENT virus. And yes, the virus could adapt, but I'd rather live pain free for a short time than be miserable my entire my life.

Best wishes.

PS: I am not on haart treatment, just PrEP treatment.
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replied December 23rd, 2015
TD

how are u right now?did u still have symptom after taking PreP..please let me know??
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replied December 23rd, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
M,

In general, I am feeling better than before I started the medication. Specifically, I have stopped experiencing pain in my feet, head, shoulders, legs, and back. Before I was not able to sleep because the wasting in my shoulders was so painful that it would wake me up - but now I sleep very well. Only time will tell if my condition further improves, declines, or stays the same. But I would rather be healthier on the medication than sicker not on the medication. In the future, I would also like to pursue the vaccine being developed in Japan for HTLV, since if that can further reduce the virus, my health might further improve.

Best wishes, and Merry Christmas to everyone.
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replied December 24th, 2015
Can u inbox me your no whatsaap..I want to know further about your symptom..thanks
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replied December 25th, 2015
Extremely eHealthy
M,

What country are you in?

Everyone else,

If you are outside the USA, Truvada is about twenty times cheaper ($55 per month versus $1,000 per month), being sold under the name Tenvir. People who are HIV negative are taking it to prevent being infected with HIV (this modality is called PrEP, or Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). In my honest opinion, people who are NOT taking this medication are stupidly risking their lives by not using this medication that cost less than $2 a day.

Best wishes, and Merry Christmas.
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replied December 30th, 2015
Experienced User
TD,

do you have urinary symptoms? have you tried something to manage them ? thank you and happy New Year.

J
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replied January 3rd, 2016
Extremely eHealthy
Yes, the urinary symptoms that I have are urgency to urinate, and rarely some leakage. I recall AdviseMe saying that he completely lost control of his bladder. I am not doing anything specific to address those symptoms, but there are over the counter supplements for urinary health.

Thank you & happy new year.
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replied January 3rd, 2016
Experienced User
thank you, my friend. I have the exact same urinary symptoms.

Overall, my conditions are better than 1 year ago; but my issues are still there and will start to see a neurologist in a couple of months for periodic check-ups. It's time to act.

Happy 2016.
J
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replied January 6th, 2016
Active User, very eHealthy
Happy NYear too. I could not help telling abt this legendary grandma who committed to hugging soldiers... if you havent read... on the washington post. You can easily find it.
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replied January 13th, 2016
Extremely eHealthy
From the HTLVhelp face book page:

The impact of ketogenic (low carb) diet has been shown to improve the lives of those with HIV, Alzheimers, Parkinsons, so perhaps it can also help those of us suffering with HTLV.

This reminds me of DFrank saying that he had reduced his carb intake and felt better in terms of less yeast infections, energy, etc.

Best wishes.
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replied January 19th, 2016
So I might be a new member to this exclusive club with undiagnosed symptoms.My exposure was brief vaginal sex with someone who i strongly believe has hiv.My exposure was 220 days ago,13th june 2015.Till this day i have so many symptoms like generalized lymphadenopathy,rashes and lesions on shoulder and chest,folliculitis on face,muscle aches,occasional diarrhea and extreme nausea most of the times.I also had shingles after 2 weeks of exposure and some peripheral neuropathy after 3 months of exposure.I have tested for hiv1&2 pcr dna and rna at 20,30,60,80,130,165 days and hiv 1&2 antibodies at 4,8,12,16,20,24,28,32 weeks.And I also had complete blood count every 2 weeks.Everything was within the range.I had cd4 count after 30 days exposure and it 514 ,33% but cd4/cd8 ratio was inverted at 0.79 which worried me alot.Also for the last three months my eosinophils were slightly elevated at 6-9 % where the range should be 0-6 %.But for the last month my eosinophils were elevated at 28% and doctor said I have eosinophilia due to some serious infection.He says hiv could be possible in very rare case if there was a rare strain involved like hiv-2 which exists in my country.Also I tested for cmv and ebv also but they came positive for past infection.Also i was negative for hepatitis B&C.I just pray to god it isnt something serious like hiv or htlv although my symptoms are very similar to hiv especially the persistent lymphadenopathy.
I will keep updating this thread.I am negative till no at 7.5 months or 32 weeks.
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replied January 19th, 2016
Extremely eHealthy
S,

Welcome! It's HTLV.

Best wishes.
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replied January 19th, 2016
Hi tony you are an inspiration still here after so many years.I will test for htlv once my hiv concerns are completly addressd.I am really concerned by eosinophilia and eosinophillic folliculitis because it happens only in hiv patients.I will do a cd4 count and peripheral blood smear test today.I will post the results once they come.
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replied January 19th, 2016
Extremely eHealthy
S,

Thank you for your kind words! But you have tested negative for HIV fifteen times (if I am counting correctly), so it is time for you to let go of your HIV concern - NO disorder "happens ONLY in HIV patients". You do NOT have HIV.

Best wishes.
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replied January 20th, 2016
Thanks Tony for the reply.While i agree with you i dont hiv-1 but i wouldnt say the same for hiv-2 since not much is known about its window period. Actually there is not a single study for hiv-2 window period.Just 2-3 case studies.I know its the standard replies of worried wells but in my country hiv-2 affects a significant population.
I just got my results of peripheral smear and ige and igg antibodies.Ige antibodies are 550 u/ml which should be less than 100 u/ml.And peripheral smear showed eosinophilia.Also consulted with two doctors.They said they have a clinical suspicion for hiv-2 since there is a possibility that hiv-2 window period is more.So they both said I have to wait one year to get in the clear and when i asked about htlv they said they dont diagnose htlv since they dont have any treatment for it.But they also said eosinophilia is more associated with hiv-2 than hiv-1.I have no reason to mistrust them since one of them is national president for hiv organisation.
So i'll keep testing till one year and keep updating this thread.
Just pray for me guys.
I guess i dont have any other alternative.
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replied January 20th, 2016
Extremely eHealthy
S,

I'm sorry, but you are wasting your time chasing HIV. You don't have HIV, and neither do any of the rest of us. Please take comfort in that, and move on. You risk being put into a rubber room if you aren't careful about insisting you have HIV when you don't - it's happened to other people. You are partially correct that eosinophilia happens with people infected with HTLV-2, not HIV.

Best wishes.
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replied January 21st, 2016
Tony,
There is enough evidence that seroconversion in hiv-2 might be delayed.I just dont want to miss it.Also I'm not disagreeing with you about htlv.There is a strong possibility of that also.But to not investigate hiv-2 when it is pretty much endemic in my country would not be the right thing.
Just to update you I had few blood tests yesterday. Hiv1&2 western blot,hiv 1&2 rna qualitative,hiv-2 proviral dna and cd-4 count.I will get the western blot result tomorrow and other results later.I will update the thread as soon as i get the result.
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