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Certain HIV positive, but negative tests (Page 83)

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July 2nd, 2013
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Examining human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and replication by cell-free infection with recombinant virus vectors.

Authors
Derse D, Hill SA, Lloyd PA, Chung Hk, Morse BA.
Journal
J Virol. 2001 Sep;75(1Cool:8461-8.

Affiliation
Basic Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. derse@ncifcrf.gov

Abstract
A sensitive and quantitative cell-free infection assay, utilizing recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-based vectors, was developed in order to analyze early events in the virus replication cycle. Previous difficulties with the low infectivity and restricted expression of the virus have prevented a clear understanding of these events. Virus stocks were generated by transfecting cells with three plasmids: (i) a packaging plasmid encoding HTLV-1 structural and regulatory proteins, (ii) an HTLV-1 transfer vector containing either firefly luciferase or enhanced yellow fluorescent protein genes, and (iii) an envelope expression plasmid. Single-round infections were initiated by exposing target cells to filtered supernatants and quantified by assaying for luciferase activity in cell extracts or by enumerating transduced cells by flow cytometry. Transduction was dependent on reverse transcription and integration of the recombinant virus genome, as shown by the effects of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) and by mutation of the integrase gene in the packaging vector, respectively. The 50% inhibitory concentration of AZT was determined to be 30 nM in this HTLV-1 replication system. The stability of HTLV-1 particles, pseudotyped with either vesicular stomatitis virus G protein or HTLV-1 envelope, was typical of retroviruses, exhibiting a half-life of approximately 3.5 h at 37 degrees C. The specific infectivity of recombinant HTLV-1 virions was at least 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of analogous HIV-1 particles, though both were pseudotyped with the same envelope. Thus, the low infectivity of HTLV-1 is determined in large part by properties of the core particle and by the efficiency of postentry processes.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
Experienced User
Examining human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and replication by cell-free infection with recombinant virus vectors.

Abstract
A sensitive and quantitative cell-free infection assay, utilizing recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-based vectors, was developed in order to analyze early events in the virus replication cycle. Previous difficulties with the low infectivity and restricted expression of the virus have prevented a clear understanding of these events. Virus stocks were generated by transfecting cells with three plasmids: (i) a packaging plasmid encoding HTLV-1 structural and regulatory proteins, (ii) an HTLV-1 transfer vector containing either firefly luciferase or enhanced yellow fluorescent protein genes, and (iii) an envelope expression plasmid. Single-round infections were initiated by exposing target cells to filtered supernatants and quantified by assaying for luciferase activity in cell extracts or by enumerating transduced cells by flow cytometry. Transduction was dependent on reverse transcription and integration of the recombinant virus genome, as shown by the effects of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) and by mutation of the integrase gene in the packaging vector, respectively. The 50% inhibitory concentration of AZT was determined to be 30 nM in this HTLV-1 replication system. The stability of HTLV-1 particles, pseudotyped with either vesicular stomatitis virus G protein or HTLV-1 envelope, was typical of retroviruses, exhibiting a half-life of approximately 3.5 h at 37 degrees C. The specific infectivity of recombinant HTLV-1 virions was at least 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of analogous HIV-1 particles, though both were pseudotyped with the same envelope. Thus, the low infectivity of HTLV-1 is determined in large part by properties of the core particle and by the efficiency of postentry processes.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) is the first discovered retrovirus causing malignancy in human. HTLV infection affects host's ocular tolerance and causes various diseases in the eye. Here we discuss the manifestations, mechanisms, treatments, and future directions of HTLV-related ocular diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent serological researches showed that the number of HTLV-1 carriers in metropolitan area was increasing, although seroprevalence of HTLV-1 in general population was decreased after screening serological tests in blood donors started. The most common clinical entity of uveitis was still HTLV-1 uveitis in HTLV-1 highly endemic area, but prevalence of HTLV-1 uveitis varies in different parts of the world. As for treatment of inflammation, tacrolimus and 5-azacytidine were reported to be effective for autoimmune manifestations in HTLV-1-related overlap syndrome (deratomyositis/Sjogren's syndrome) and HTLV-1-related myelodysplastic syndrome. Interleukin-2 receptor targeted therapies improved scleritis in patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma caused by HTLV-1. Basic researches identified that HTLV-1 tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor play critical roles in the HTLV-1-related disease and are now being investigated as targeted therapies.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
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Tony,
You should post the name of the case study also so that we could look it up ourselves.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2012 Nov;23(6):557-61. doi: 10.1097 ICU 0b013e328358b9ec
HTLV infection and the eye.
Kamoi K, Mochizuki M.
Source

Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
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Tony
yet another study that proves the effectiveness of azacytidine for htlv treatment. I'm glad to see this is a recent case study also.
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replied July 2nd, 2013
Experienced User
Someone i know that has htlv 2 developed uveitis 4 years after infection.
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Experienced User
Does anyone here have uveitis? My eyes are a bit red with lines
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
WK,

We all have red eyes, but uveitis requires an eye doctor to make a diagnosis.

Best wishes.
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Experienced User
Oh fair enough... Will an optometrist be able to tell u? Have u got uveitis tony?
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
The last time I was checked for Uveitis was over a year ago (negative). Currently my kids are visiting me, but in a few weeks I plan on getting my eyes checked again, and will get examined for Uveitis every year from now on.

Best wishes.
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
The last time I was checked for Uveitis was over a year ago (negative). Currently my kids are visiting me, but in a few weeks when they leave, I plan on getting my eyes checked again, and will get examined for Uveitis every year from now on. All of you should do the same.

Best wishes.
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Users who thank TonyDewitt for this post: Whoknows1 

replied July 3rd, 2013
Experienced User
Yeh I'm gonna go next week to see. My eyes do look more red.. Do you have a stuff neck? Is that a symptom also?
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Yes, everything is stiff, and I would categorize that as arthritis / arthralgia, classic HTLV symptoms. Since both HIV & HTLV are retroviruses, it's easy to see that they share similar symptoms:

1. Dermatitis / itching
2. Candida / fungal infections
3. Arthritis / Arthralgia / stiffness
4. Wasting / muscles especially at shoulders & thighs.
5. Aveolitis / lung problems.
6. Uveitis / conjunctivitis / eye problems.

Best wishes.
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Experienced User
I've been tested for all arthritis and inflammation which all came back negative in blood tests.. I did lose weight about 3 months ago but have put it back on. Haven't had any bloating and hve been eating well.. Only sympoms is dirty tongue-
/thrush , blotchy palms that come and go and dizzyness and disoriented. Also phlegm in my throat
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replied July 3rd, 2013
Experienced User
Well spoken Tony. We all know this isn't something psychological. Many of the symptoms are impossible to be caused by something psychological, I conclude this based on pure rational thinking.
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Users who thank msamsamsa for this post: TonyDewitt  TonyDewitt 

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replied July 5th, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Thank you.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Has anyone heard of NESTED PCR TAX TEST FOR HTLV?
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replied July 5th, 2013
Has anyone hear ever heard of NESTED PCR TAX Test for HTLV?
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replied July 5th, 2013
Has anyone heard of a NESTED PCR TAX TEST for HTLV or how accurate this might be?
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replied July 5th, 2013
Experienced User
Hello everyone,

I wish I could say I'm doing better but I'm not. I'm going to see another gi dr next month and hopefully get diagnosis. This is my biggest issues right now. Alot of abdominal pains and discomfort. Also my stools just aren't the same anymore. Muscle waisting and fatigue and leg pain and weakness. Alot of back pain also.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Scared,

Same here - I share your symptoms. I am taking yogurt with 4 Curcumin tablets for breakfast each day, and that has corrected my stools big time. When I run out of yogurt, my stool go crazy. Please try the yogurt & curcumin they will help.

Best wishes.
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replied July 6th, 2013
Experienced User
im not feeling the best either.. my hands and skin is icthy and tingly, my throat is the same, hip joints are sore and sensitive. i cant lose weight and feel bloated very easily. ive noticed my ankles have red blotchy look its so weird. im scared that this could be CIRROHOSIS due to Hep C i match alot of the symtoms. im terribly depressed again. i also wanna test for parasites.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Has anyone heard of or know anything about a NESTED PCR TAX for HTLV? Trying to find out if this might be a more accurate test.
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Bresh
I have heard about it and it seems like a tool that investigates for htlv infection,
I'm wondering why you are asking.
Is this tool available to you.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Guys, has anyone here tested positive (whether via PCR, Ab or WB) for HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 ? So far I've tested for all of the above and the results were all negative....symptoms remain the same...don't know what else to test...
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Resperanza
I'm glad to hear that all your htlv test came back negative and i know its been years since your last exposure, i would say you are conclusively negative for htlv, be careful and don't put yourself at risk again, i know i don't have to say it but i just thought i would remind you anyways.
I think if you test for a lymphocites panel and if it comeback within range it would add to the indication that you are ok, but if its out of range then there might be something serious going on with some of your immune cells.
Have you ever had a lymphocite panel?
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Resperanza,

We all need to take that new HTLV test developed by the Gene ID company in San Carlo, Brazil. It's a new test that has been developed because HTLV is a MAJOR problem in Brazil. When you call them please buy a test kit for me & I will repay you.

Best thanks.
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replied July 5th, 2013
I don't think so REsperanza, may I ask your symptoms?
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Bresh,
Is the nested tax pcr available to you?
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replied July 5th, 2013
I think I'm gonna try to get an infectious disease dr to give that test but tony says its a hit or miss like the other tests so I don't know... I thought the tax testing woulda been reliable
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Bresh
Where are you located, what state or country?
What was your exposure and how long ago?
I could give you my opinion if you like.
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replied July 5th, 2013
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Bresh
The reason i ask is because if you live in the U.S.
I highly doubt you will be able to obtain a nested tax pcr.
The only htlv pcr i seen available in the U.S. is by focus diagnostics, licensed by roche, wich is a Real Time qualitative pcr for the gag region.
Maybe after being diagnosed you might be able to obtain some more options by research facilities, these optione include a quantitative pcr, not sure for what gene, also rarely some research facilities have pcr that could genotype.
So again if u live int the U.S. the easiest pcr to obtain is the one evaluated by Focus Diagnostics wich looks for the gag region.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
Bresh1,

I've cited many articles and the official position the Organ Donation governing body that HTLV cannot be detected, even with PCR testing, and that goes for TAX testing as well. There is a new HTLV test developed by a company called Gene ID in San Carlo, Brazil, that we should ALL BE TAKING, since testing positive on a HTLV test is the FIRST STEP in doctors taking us seriously.

Scared,

You know I respect your thoughts & efforts & thousands of dollars spent going to doctors, but at this point, doctors are just going to laugh in your face, I know because that's what happened to me 6 weeks ago - the doctor refused to test me for ANYTHING, laughed off HTLV, had his nurse take my vitals & sent me a bill for $115.

We have a pretty good idea what this is, we know it killed the gang on the body nine years ago. A positive test for HTLV would give us legitimacy with the medical community - not that we need it since we ALREADY KNOW that we are sick. So let's all try to take the test developed by San Carlo in Brazil, Resperanza speaks Portuguese & has agreed to call.

If we do all test positive on the new HTLV test, the next step is to find a doctor who will write a prescription for the Azacytidine. If we skip the testing & just get the Azacytidine, same difference, we get treated and get better like the guy in Greece did after 8 MONTHS.

Everyone,

I've been living in this hell for TWENTY months - we all have VERY SIMILAR symptoms, and live NO WHERE near each other. Putting this all together (long term illness & same symptoms & widely dispersed locations) means that we are looking at the next big epidemic that no one has ever heard of. Im sure none of you even heard about HTLV before getting sick, but you've heard of HIV, TB, Measles, Chickenpox, Smallpox, Ebola, Bubonic plague, etc. Think about the implications of a unknown, worldwide epidemic. Like Ive said MANY TIMES, we don't have all the time in the world, both in term of our bodies succumbing to this illness, and the FLOOD of people who are going to be jammed into doctor's offices when this damn thing spreads soon. We can work together as a team & beat this thing before it becomes the next plague. Please hump towards a hematologist, ask all of your friends, relatives, neighbors, and when you find one, tell him/her that we need to be treated with Azacytidine.

Best wishes.
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replied July 5th, 2013
Experienced User
How does all the other people get diagnosed if these tests don't work
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replied July 5th, 2013
Extremely eHealthy
WK,

Read all of the medical articles where doctors are struggling to find HTLV in people who have all of the symptoms of HTLV. And the Organ Donation Network won't declare a donor recipient HTLV negative even after A YEAR of testing, including PCR testing. The answer to your question is that some people take YEARS to test positive, as Sowadsky wrote on TheBody site. And Alberto from Italy took YEARS to test positive, and when he did, it was only by PCR. And if these tests did work, Brazil wouldn't need to develop a new test. Sorry but there's too much evidence from too many sources that these tests don't work.

Best wishes.
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