Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > Hypoglycemia Forum

Calcium causes insulin release!!!

I have had reactive hypo for probably 15-20 years--lost count! Anyway, I just eat every 2 hours while awake.

I have recently researched and found out that raising blood levels of calcium can cause the pancreas to release insulin, which we all know will turn into a hypo. My question is, does anyone here notice that taking a calcium actually CAUSES a hypo to happen to them??? I don't take calcium very often as it bothers my stomach big time. However, every once in a while I take a low-dose of calcium. And, probably half of the time, my blood sugar drops about an hour later!! I joked with my husband at first that, wow, calcium and/or vit. D was making my sugar drop. Lo and behold, after research, i found the calcium/insulin connection!! Anyone notice if it affects them?
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replied November 1st, 2010
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You'd have to be taking a lot, but I've never noticed any changes. I take half a pill twice a day, that's it. You might be taking too much if it happened, otherwise you might be connecting it but it's not doing anything at all really. If you're still having symptoms you're doing something else wrong after that much time. From what I've read, the calcium thing only comes into effect if you're starting to become diabetic, which you will over time if you don't properly treat hypoglycemia. If you've had it for that long, you might be reaching that point. I have no symptoms anymore unless I eat something I shouldn't.
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replied November 1st, 2010
Thanks, Stan, for letting me know that it doesn't affect you. I am curious if I am the only one!
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replied January 29th, 2011
Hi I just want to say I have this problem with chromium picolinate. I have consistently gotten dizzy within an hour of taking this supplement. It's supposed to do the opposite!
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replied January 30th, 2011
Calcium is involved in the phaseI release of insulin stored in the pancreas:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2009/04/ 15/0901202106.abstract

and with insulin sensitivity:

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/164/ 5/449.abstract
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replied January 19th, 2012
I have heard that chromium picolinate regulates blood sugar in diabetics, but not in hypoglycemia. Can anyone else let me know if this is true or false? Thanx
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replied March 28th, 2013
Calcium is needed for release of insulin from the beta cells of the pancreas. The insulin is stored in tiny sacs in the beta cells called vesicles. When the beta cells detect high blood sugar, a series of steps take place that allow calcium to enter the cell. The calcium in turn helps the vesicle fuse to the cell wall, so that the insulin is released into the bloodstream. So calcium is an integral and necessary part of normal insulin release.

I really don't see how higher than normal calcium levels would result in excess insulin being released. The calcium doesn't enter the cell, unless excess glucose is detected in the blood.

I would love to see the studies if you could reveal them, so I could understand the proposed mechanism.
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replied April 30th, 2013
hiya,
i also have recently found i get really bad racing heart and palpitations after taking a whole calcium tablet, but half of one is ok.
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replied May 2nd, 2013
Try checking what else is in the tablet. You never know. Other then that, perhaps the calcium is causing something else in your body to happen that would trigger a train of events
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