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Bulging disc cause hip pain ??

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Hip pain..bulging disc:
Hello, A few months back a fell through a ceiling. Ever since I have been having issues with my right lower back... but mostly my hip, right hip and now my left. I had xrays, bone scan, and and MRI. My MRI states the following benign hemangiomas are noted at S2 and S3 vertebral bodies. L3-L4 bulging disc is seen along with slight narrowing of the lateral recesses. L4-L5 a bulging disc is seen without foraminal narrowing. My question is this, I have more pain around my hip area then back and could a bulging disc cause my hip pain.
I have been really uncomfortable and in on and off again pain..It feels more like something is wrong with my hips but the MRI of that states everything was normal.
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replied December 29th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
hi leeniewho
yes compression of the nerves in the spine can certainly cause your hip to hurt. you need a skilled neuro or orthopedic surgeon who specializes on the spine. dont leave the analysis of an mri to anyone else. the surgeon will look at all your symptoms and compare them to what he sees on the mri. the hip pain may be caused by the bulging disc or it might be from the hemangiomas. best you consult with the expert.
if you are interested in learning what nerve roots affect what areas then google dermatome map. it will show you the nerve roots that affect the hip areas. please tell us what the surgeon advises....pete
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replied December 29th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
MRI is not the best testing for him problems, X-ray and CT are much better.

It is possible that your hip problem is from bursitis and that you fall and spine issues brought on the pain from the bursitis.

It can also be that you are feeling hip pain because you are not moving correctly due to the lumbar spine pain.
Not walking and moving correctly will pull on other muscles and ligaments in other parts of your body, especially the hips and that in itself can create the pain.

Pete is correct, you need an evaluation from a spine surgeon, either an orthopedic surgeon that specializes in spines or a neurosurgeon that specializes in spines, so that you can be properly diagnosed and a treatment plan suggested.

A dermatome map will give you an idea of what nerves coming out of the spine can be affecting your spine as well.

Most of us don't realize how the nerves in our spinal canal affect so many other parts of our bodies until we start to have problems, especially spine problems.

The dermatome map will be a big shock to see how they affect the body.

Good luck and let us know how you make out.

Fran
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replied December 30th, 2009
Thanks you for the replies..I will definitly look up that map, this is all so new I wasn't really sure where to go, as I feel like no one is listening. I did see an orthopaedist and he said nothing about the hemangiomas and bursitis they said was ruled out. My doctor did not look at the actual MRI pictures he only read the results of the report.I know this because at my appointment I brought the discs with me and when he looked in my file she said he needed the girls to call for the report they didn't have it.They brought the report to the room, he was there with me so he never actually looked at the pictures. He said my options were to see a pain specialist for shot or PT. I chose PT. I did ask if the problems of my lower back could effect my upper back, I have a tender spot in the dead center of my back between my shoulder blades.
I am an active person and am hating how I feel everyday. I would really like to wake up feeling like my old self.
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replied December 30th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
hi again
you dont sound too excited about the ortho surgeon you saw. i would be tempted to get a second opinion. and do make sure that the ortho specializes on the spine. its not good that he neglected to look at the mri images.
bear in mind that i'm no doc. i just had the bad luck of going through 7 spine surgeries and two hip replacements. i do try to steer people in the right direction in order to get help with their pain.
if the discs are causing your hip pain then physical therapy could very well help. i would give it a shot but if pain increases you need to see a surgeon again.
just so you know hemengiomas are tumors. apparently yours are benign but a tumor can put pressure on nerves. if you look at a dermatome map the s2 and s3 spinal nerves do affect an area behind your hip so it would be good for a specialist to look at the mri pictures of those growths. you probably had those all along but who knows the fall might have affected that area of the sacrum.
i sure hope the physical therapy helps you. at any rate it will be good to start moving again. please keep us posted with your progress.

pete
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replied December 30th, 2009
Extremely eHealthy
You should definitely get a second opinion from another orthopedic surgeon that specializes in spines only.

The fact that your present ortho never looked at the MRI pics is very telling. He based his diagnosis on someone else's "opinion" and not his own.

The reading of the MRI that your doctor looked at is really nothing more than that, an opinion.
You could take those MRI images to another MRI radiologist to read or another doctor and get different opinions.

Essentially what you are doing know is following the medical advise given to you by a doctor who has based his diagnosis on someone else's opinion and never formed one of his own.

Not a good way to diagnose a patient.

Lots of things go into reading an MRI and in some things, such as how the vertebrae are counted, there is no standard that is used.

If you have a really "normal looking spine" then there may not be a problem in how the vertebrae are counted.

On the other hand, if you have some fusion at the base of your spine, which many people do, then that area may or may not be counted as a vertebrae. Then when the vertebrae are counted, what is really L3/L4, can be counted as L4/L5.

Believe me, I know about this one as I have that problem and several second opinions that I saw before my surgery, did not count correctly and disagreed with the radiology report.

Even my own daughter, who was in college at the time and majoring in biology/anatomy and physiology/genetics and microbiology, could see by looking at my MRI films that some of the second opinion docs where wrong as was one radiologist that gave another opinion.

Another thing as well, hemangiomas can appear on MRI pics with one MRI and when another one is done, they will be gone. I had that happen with a second MRI a year after my surgery. One appeared in the pics.
Subsequent MRIs a year after that one and 2 years later, never showed the hemangioma again and the MRIs where all done at the same facility and read by the same radiologist and the views where all seen and examined by my spine surgeon.

Physical therapy might help, but you should get a second opinion and specifically go over all that the views of the MRI show with a spine surgeon.

If a spine surgeon isn't willing to look at the MRI pics and go over them with you to point out where problems are and what is causing or may be causing your pain, you need to leave the spine surgeon and get another one right away.

What is considered slight narrowing of the lateral recess by one radiologist, can be seen as moderate by another.

Also, just because the opinion is slight, doesn't mean that it isn't causing you specifically pain.

Lateral recess narrowing and nerve compression in that area is the leading cause of failed spine decompression because many spine surgeons ignore that area of the vertebrae when doing surgery.

Get another opinion as fast as you can.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Fran
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replied February 22nd, 2011
New guidelines from the College of American Physicians call doctors to scrap any imaging for regular back pain. Sounds like you have sciatica pain, since it travels around your lower back from side to side. Your call to action is to find a sciatica home treatment method, one that will strengthen and loosen you lower back, and get rid of the pain.
Surgery is not the answer. In most cases, the pain returns to a disc above or below the one operated on. Besides you have a one in five chance of the operation failing completely.
you can sign in to get a free report showing you how to eliminate your pain fast.
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