Medical Questions > Mental Health > Sleep Disorders Forum

Breathing stops at moment of falling asleep (Page 8)


November 15th, 2016
There may be various reasons for this, but one cause could really be the magnesium issue as mentioned. That was my issue. This started suddenly for me (although it did happen many years ago for one night). So I took stock of anything new I was eating, new activities, etc. I am on no medications or have no new stress in life beyond the usual. I noticed the one thing that was new was that I was going to the gym a lot recently. The previous posts about this happening to people who are hyperventilating (from anxiety attacks) got me thinking that the increased respiration (whether from exercise or anxiety) could be causing some electrolyte imbalance. I noticed, in addition to the apnea at the point of falling asleep, that during the day/wakefulness my breathing appeared more "labored" than normal. It was not so much difficulty breathing but a more conscious engagement in it, including purposefully taking deep breaths.

Thanks to the original poster who suggested magnesium. I figured why not, it's not really harmful (in typical quantities) and it's inexpensive. So I started some daily magnesium and within a day, my sleeping improved improved and the apnea is gone. I also don't feel the "labor" of breathing either. Again, there might be different causes of this apnea, but the magnesium helped in my case.
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replied November 18th, 2016
Thanks UrbanCowboy, I really hoped my post would help someone as it helped me. I think it's always worth a try. The best magnesium for my case is the pidolate. My symptoms too were worst after gym.
Hope you get healed 100%
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Users who thank stremomma for this post: UrbanCowboy 

replied November 21st, 2016
I just used regular magnesium oxide 400mg (supplement aisle in your local pharmacy) but I did a double dose for the first few days. MagOx does have a laxative effect. I've since tapered it to twice a week. I'm adding high magnesium foods (which is always the best natural source) to taper off the supplements.

Magnesium deficiency is rather under-diagnosed today so be sure to add a magnesium level if you are having a blood test (although there is some debate on how accurate magnesium tests are).
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replied November 24th, 2016
Weird sleep anxiety thing
Well ya'll aren't alone....I go through this crap too! I feel better now though knowing I'm not alone Smile Happy Thanksgiving
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replied November 24th, 2016
Well ya'll aren't alone....I go through this crap too! I feel better now though knowing I'm not alone Smile Happy Thanksgiving
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replied December 12th, 2016
Hello and welcome

I had also faced this problem. And it seems like the symptoms of sleep apnea which could be potentially dangerous. You should consult your doctor about this.
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replied December 15th, 2016
I'm curious if anyone has suspected or been diagnosed with hypokalemia? Low potassium (hypokalemia) can cause respiratory depression.
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replied December 15th, 2016
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replied December 25th, 2016
Merry Christmas people.. Ok, so i have been dealing with this for almost 10 years. i have tried EVERYTHING over the years from sleep tests, to tests for GERD, change in diet, quit smoking,change in the way i sleep, breathing techniques, no tv before bed, over the counter medicine for nasal problems, allergy tests.. you name it and i have tried it. I also just read every comment on this post, all 8 pages and maybe i missed it but aside from a couple ways to help treat it, i am convinced that there is no cure. I have noticed over the years that it comes and goes and some nights it happens once and some nights it happens for hours. i have really just given up at this point and have concluded that i will live with this for the rest of my life.

What happens to me is when i transition to falling asleep, i jolt up and it feels like i have not taken a breath for 30 seconds, i can not breathe until i swallow. after reading all these posts i did not see anyone return to the chain and say that they have FOUND a fix. If you have the fix plese email me. until then, good luck everyone and know that you are not alone!
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replied March 20th, 2017
Ondine's Curse

This symptom of not being able to breathe upon falling asleep is known as Ondines's Curse.

Sulfites cause or exacerbate this problem for me.

Sulfites are found in wine and dried fruits, but hide in many consumables, including tea bags.
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replied January 4th, 2017
You may suffering from Apnea that is medical word used to describe slowed or stopped breathing. It happans when the airways become blocked or when brain disables to send a single to breathe. The cause of your apnea is connected with type of apnea that you have. As you discussed that you facing this problem when you sleep. It indicated, you are facing sleep apnea and its causes listed below:

overly relaxed throat muscles or tongueen
larged tongue
enlarged tonsils
being overweight
irregular function of the brain signals that control the throat muscles
the shape of your head and neck

Now you need to call a doctor and tell him/her all condition that you are faced. Doctor will give best advice and medicines.
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replied February 2nd, 2017
I have this too it's really scary and annoying I love sleeping errr. I've just had blood work done and my iron levels are very low. I'm starting on iron as I'm hesitant about the iron infusion. My dr thinks this is why I feel breathless and fatigued and from what I've read iron levels effect sleep apnea so I'm hoping this is just a bi product of very low iron.
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replied February 28th, 2017
I know this thread is very old but I thought I would just share my experience in case someone wanted a solution. I dont know if this is the case for everyone, but a couple years ago this used to happen to me all of the time (at least once a week) I never talked to a doctor about it but I eventually was able to find that the reason it was happening to me was because of stress. Once I found this out I just started relaxing more by finding things I enjoyed doing that kept me calm during the day. Once I was able to free myself of a lot of the stress I have never had the problem since. (Knock on wood that it doesnt come back) hope this helps Smile
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replied March 12th, 2017
Benadryl was recommended to me a while back as a sleep aid by a guy whose relative is a Dr. It lingers in my body too long for me to try but if you are not suffering from the things i am it might work for you.

Other than that, I have a shot of rum just before bed and it gets me over the breathing thing hump and off to sleep.I don't drink hard liquor typically so that shot-sized sip before bed is just enough to fog my brain I guess

If I drink too much rum before bed I just wake up in 4 hrs which doesn't help things either
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replied March 20th, 2017
Ondine's Curse

This symptom of not being able to breathe upon falling asleep is known as Ondines's Curse.

Sulfites cause or exacerbate this problem for me.

Sulfites are found in wine and dried fruits, but hide in many consumables, including tea bags.
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replied April 10th, 2017
It seems like this post is still active, thankfully! I've recently had this happen, and it has been for the last couple of weeks. It's somewhat terrifying. I also have the feeling that breathing is more "on purpose" and "manual" during waking hours, like I have shallow breathing and have to consciously breath deeper. This has never been an issue in my life, before the last year or so. I've been to my doctor about the latter, they don't seem concerned. However, the issue of suddenly waking with a need to inhale while falling asleep is recent, but is very impactful. I do take magnesium but I have not noticed an affect in this area. Hoping to hear how others have resolved. FYI, I don't think it's Odine's Curse, as that seems to be quite serious and life-threatening.
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replied April 20th, 2017
im wondering if their is a connection between the neurotransmitters and sleep disorders where the brain isn't sending the proper signal to the body . Has anyone had a neurotransmitters test done to test for chemical imbalances?. I'ved read that GABA and acetylcholine depletion can cause sleeping problems. i am by no means a Doctor but suggesting maybe looking up the connection on GABA and sleep disorders >
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replied April 20th, 2017
This sounds interesting and I'd love to know if this has been done!
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replied April 20th, 2017
There are actual independent Labs that do these neurotransmitter test. If your not sure you can always ask your doctor and if insurance will cover its. Once your test results are in and you know what your chemical levels are you can work with a holistic naturopathic doctor to address these issues > As far as your breathing is concern you can order the breathslim breathing device on Amazon which is good for respiratory training. Although it is marketed as a weight loss item this device was mentioned on Dr Sircus website for promoting health benefits and training your body to breathe properly just by using it 20 minutes a day.
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replied April 21st, 2017
Another supplement of interest that you might want to check out is 5-HTP which is a precursor to serotonin neurotransmitter. 5-HTP is a natural remedy for sleep apnea as there have been studies done on the linked between sleep apnea and Serotonin per the article states " A certain serotonin level is needed in the nerves that control breathing in order to receive information from the brain. An improperly-working serotonin system deprives the body of adequate supply of the neurotransmitter, often resulting in sleep apnea. In addition the release of hormones like cortisol is controlled by serotonin receptors. Among other things cortisol supports the control of muscles needed for breathing. "
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