Medical Questions > Conditions and Diseases > TMJ Forum

anterior meniscus of the jaw

i have been suffering with jaw, neck, temple and scalp pain for 8 months.
it all started with a dental proceedure in which i believe the dentist
threw my jaw out of whack.
i just had an MRI which reported that the anterior meniscus of the jaw is
dislocated. what should i do? is surgery - as that is what is what has been mentioned,
but i think there has been a lot of damage to the jaw (bone?).
i just want to get some options in my head before i see or talk to any professionals.

odessas
Did you find this post helpful?
|

replied August 8th, 2012
anterior dislocation of the meniscus of TMJ
Hi there,

I just found your post above and am interested in what you decided. I also have an anterior dislocation of the meniscus and need to weigh out my options.

Any help you can offer is greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 9th, 2012
Experienced User
If the meniscus, or disk, is not causing you any pain, just leave it. It will usually adapt over time. You may have a little "click" in your jaw when opening or closing, but there are many, many people with anterior displacements who get along just fine.
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 9th, 2012
My jaw used to click when I opened my mouth fully but now I can only open my mouth partway (about 2 finger widths).

Can you clarify what you mean by "adapt"? Do you mean the disc will eventually slip back into place?
|
Did you find this post helpful?

replied August 11th, 2012
Experienced User
Sometimes the disk may return to a more normal position, but it would be very rare. It is also rare for the disk to surgically be replaced and have it stay there. Repositioning the jaw with repositioning appliances has also been shown to have a very low long term success rate. Of course, the disk can also move further forward and lead to what you are experiencing, which is the inability for your condyle ( the ball joint at the end of your lower jaw ) to slip back under the disk as you open. The best we can do is to try to help manage the forces that occur, usually at night time, but also during the day, if you clench. That way, the whole joint doesn't work perfectly, but adapts to the new positions of each structure and functions within normal limits.
|
Did you find this post helpful?