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Adenosquamous carcinoma

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So here's my story... I'm 27 and my paps have always come back normal up until this year. About two months ago I went in for my yearly and it came back w/high grade cells on it. So my gynocologist did a colposcopy which came back CIN 3 .... Well, then I was scheduled for a cone biopsy (which I had about two weeks ago) The results from that came in as adenosquamous carcinoma in-situ. And my margins came back clear.

Well, on my follow up app. all my gyno. told me was that I had cancer & had to go & consult with a gyno oncologist. That was it.... so I have been doing a lot of research on the internet, and I just find myself getting more & more confused. I'm wondering what type of testing I will receive next & if that means that I could have cancer in other glands as well (like in my uterus)? I'm guessing that I'll have to have a hysterectomy, but luckily my hubby & I have already had all our children, so for me that's not an issue. I'm mostly worried about if this could have spread to other places, glands, etc. And I wonder why my pap last year was normal, now all of a sudden I have stage 0 cancer.... I'm so confused! I wish my gynocologist could have been more helpful when I was asking her all these questions. She just told me I'd have to ask the oncologist.... Ugh!
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replied March 14th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Although, CIN 3 is known as carcinoma-in-situ, is not cancer of the cervix.
These results mean that cells are severely abnormal and that if they are left untreated, they could go on to develop into cervical cancer.
Cone biopsy as you had is one way to get treatment for CIN 3 and get rid of this potentially harmful area on your cervix. But, I guess what has mentioned your doctor about having cancer is that the cells broke through the top layer of mucous membrane covering the cervix and spread into the tissue underneath.
So, you'll need to discus this with an oncologist and if another biopsy is needed to determine if the abnormal cells spread deeper.
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replied March 14th, 2008
Thank you for the info! I really appreciate it!
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replied March 14th, 2008
Especially eHealthy
I'm confused on this as well. If your margins are clear, then the bad cells would have been taken care of.

When is your appointment with the Gyno-onco?
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replied March 15th, 2008
It's this coming Wed. I had to wait almost 2 weeks to get in because the doctor was on vacation. It's been horrible having to wait this long! Plus, my regular gyno. told me pretty much nothing. Ugh! I'm deff. getting a new one after this is all over with! I told my husband that it was pretty sad I had to go online and spend 2 hours looking up what my pathology report said... when my gyno. could have just told me herself Sad

Anyhow, this is what my my report says:

Cervical squamocolumnar junction with CIN3 (high grade SIL) with focal glandular differentiation (adenosquamous carcinoma in-situ).
Other findings: endocervical glandular atypia, (see comment)

Comments:
Dyplastic squamous epithelium is best described in slides A3-A7, corresponding to the 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12 o'clock quadrants of the cone. Dyplasia arises in immature metaplasia and focally exhibits glandular differentiation sometimes referred to as "adenosquamous in situ" and classified as discontinuous with "skip areas". No invasion is seen in the material submitted.

Endocervical glandular atypia is characterized by rare a mitotic figure and mild nuclear enlargement (slides A7). The endocervical and ectocervical margins of the cone, where visualized, appear free of squamous/glandular dysplasia. Close clinical follow-up with consideration of referral to a gynocologic oncologist is suggested.

I'm so confused!
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replied March 20th, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
You are welcome anytime!

Pap smears results, also involve endocervical component (sample from the endocervical canal, canal that leads from cervix to uterus cavity) Endocervical canal is lined by cells which make a transition to become those of the internal lining of the uterus and the abnormal calls usually occur at the point of transition.
Endocervical glandular atypia means that cells are less atypical than cells of adenocarcinoma in situ, but, usually are considered as precursors of adenocarcinoma in situ.
Endocervical sample that is taken as Cytobrush sample improves the detection of early-stage glandular neoplasms, but, also, many minor atypias unrelated to cervical cancer are also detected.
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