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Adderall withdrawal symptoms (Page 1)

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I am a 28 yr old male.

Four years ago i was diagnosed with ADD, and prescribed Adderall. I was originaly on the XR, but found it to be too strong and felt that the standard release (generic actually) were just fine. My current prescription is for 60mg per day.

I typically only take 30mg-45mg per day as ive been gradually stepping down as I feel I need it less and I ususally don't take much on the weekends. The only reason I hadn't brought the "padding" in my dosage to my doctor's attn is that sometimes I get busy and can't make an appointment and it gives me a buffer in between if I ever need it.

Over the last year, I had noticed that even though I was taking less than my RX dosage I seemed to run out, right at the end of the month, and I could never figure out why. My days are usually quite fast-paced and I never really had an orderly system to monitor pills and dosage so i never really invedtigated it further. Very recently I started paying closer attention to how much I took and how much I had, and I began to suspect that someone was stealing pills from me. The person i suspected the most was my girlfriend. We've been living together for almost three years, and she was the person with the most access to my bottle of pills.

Unfortunately yesterday morning, I caught her in the act and she finally fessed-up.

At first i thought it was a recent thing, and that she was only taking a few here and there,...what I came to find out was that she had basically been taking my medication on a very regular basis for a year or longer.

Yesterday also happened to be the day that I was down to 1/2 of a 30mg tablet and had not yet scheduled an appt. My last prescription really seemed to go down fast. While I was angry that she would not only steal from me, but also lied about it for so long, I was more comcerned for her than anything.

It seemed to do her some good to get everything off her chest, as she hadnt told anyone about this at all.

Even when I first suspected she might have ben sneaking some here and there, I didnt think much of it. She never seemed jittery, spacey, or overly euphoric....she's never had any trouble eating or sleeping. She explained that she took it because it helped he feel like she could think straight, do her job better, and basically listed all of the same reasons that I take it. The only difference here is, I went to an ADD clinic and got tested.

I have not yet obtained a new prescription, so she is without "her medication" as well. She definitley seems to have formed an addiction to the drug. She broke down last night and said how hard it is for her to work without it now and that she feels like she needs it.

I have no idea what to do or what to tell her....

If she truly has ADD or ADHD which she very well may, I guess she should go get tested....

If she doesn't have ADD or ADHD, from what I'm reading, she has a tough road ahead of her in terms of recovery.

I would like to talk to my psychiatrist about this, but am terribly apprehensive to do so.

Having seen many who do not have ADD/ADHD abuse adderall recreationally and how they act it does not seem to be the case with her. Personaly I dont know how anyone who isnt "supposed to" take it, could stand to take it every day.

I would appreciate any help or guidance that you can offer, as I am not sure what to do to help her. She does not have a psychiatrist and her relastionship with her PCP bears little rapport. I need to talk to someone who knows what she needs to do...

Thank you in advance for your feedback,

Jason
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replied March 22nd, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Jason,
You are right when you say she has a hard road to recovery. This drug is one of the most addicting drug I have see in my health care career. In fact, it is so bad that they have banned it altoghter in Canada. It is the rage now. There is a chance she may be able to go through this one her own depending on how much she has taken over a peroid of time. I doubt she is going to be able to. She needs to get to a drug rehab facility as soon as possible. The withdrawl it far worse then any I have seen in a long time and I have seen many. When I work Addiction and Recovery, I could tell you some horror stories. When I was in my late 20s I was addicted to antiphycotic's and any downers I could get my hands on. I was able to stop myself. I my perscription said take one, I took two. Then reality hit and let me know how dangerous drug addiction can really be. When I saw the horrific seen of a patient going through withdrawl. Get her to rehab if she gets really bad and darn it, hide those pills. I commend you on you caution in you doseing. You have will power. Please keep it that way.

Best of luck,
Carrie
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replied October 22nd, 2011
Adderall is NOT banned in Canada, in any form!
Hmm, no you should not guess. The drug is not banned in Canada at all. Where did you get this information? II live in Canada, and I have a perscription for Adderall XR, so does two other people I am friends with, in 2 other provinces.

Its actually very common. Check your sources, or please do not guess to make yourself sound good.

Regg
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replied October 22nd, 2011
Hmm, no you should not guess. The drug is not banned in Canada at all. Where did you get this information? II live in Canada, and I have a perscription for Adderall XR, so does two other people I am friends with, in 2 other provinces.

Its actually very common. Check your sources, or please do not guess to make yourself sound good.

Regg
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replied April 3rd, 2012
This is the most ridiculous advice ever!!! Get her into a rehab facility? Oh pulleeze!!!
The ONLY physical withdrawal symptom she will experience is a few days of overwhelming sleepiness. The hardest part of getting over using adderall is not physical (there are no cravings or tremors or sweats), it is mental/emotional - the anxiety of thinking you cannot function well without it. That 'fear' is what causes the panic of running out. The reality is, however, that although it sucks to run out, once you wake up from your few days of sleepiness you function just fine. You may miss the sustained focus and sense of productivity achieved with the help of adderall but after a few days you will realize that you are actually okay without it (but it's definitely better with it!).
Once you are able to see adderall as a tool and not a necessity the anxiety about losing it diminishes significantly.
Everyone who uses adderall should take a break from it periodically just to reassure themselves that they can function fine without it. This would prevent the emotional dependence everyone worries so much about.
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replied March 22nd, 2008
to Carrie
Thanks for weighing in here, but just out of curiosity......what if she actually has the same thing I have?

Shouldn't she get tested? (and go on the medication properly?)

And not to seem like I'm slighting anything, but people always bring up the Canada thing.....it is still used in Canada....THe Adderall XR was briefly banned in Canada around 2005, then within the same year it lifted the ban. Check Wikipedia....

Anyway....she has obviously formed an addiction to the drug, and there is no way to hide the pills from her.....she'll find them.......if I want to get the pills away from her Id have to move out...

As far as I can tell.....shes got the same thing I have, so she's planning on getting tested and letting the Doc prescibe whatever they see fit....hope this is the right move.
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replied November 15th, 2011
medication stealing is not ok
Dude... If you can't trust her not to steal your medications even if you hide them, she has a problem. And so do you if you think that it is ok. Don't be an enabler...
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replied March 22nd, 2008
Extremely eHealthy
Absolutly Jason. She sould be have an affermative diagnosis on what is wrong. If she is manic/Bipolar, Anxiety/Stress or ADD at least then she can be put on the medication that well work for her. Ya have to get her to go first. That is the hard part. It is when she comes to reality that there is something wrong and is concerned, is when she will be out of denial and go.
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replied April 24th, 2009
BunkID13's dilemmna
I think she must have ADD/ADHD; I have depression & my psychiatrist actually prescribed Adderall XR to me for energy (10 mg).
Although it did wake me up for work, it also made me visibly agitated (grinding my jaw, talking too much) and really repressed my appetite; and it affected me mentally - I would become very obsessive about things, spend money like water, etc. The worst part was the end of the day-I would ache all over because I would unconsciously tense myself up all day.
If you didn't notice any physical manifestations of the drug during the day, and she didn't seem to be a little manic, she must need it. Of course, the way she went about it is very unhealthy, plus, she must have known the symptoms of ADD since you've been diagnosed - why didn't she make the connection to herself?
I haven't personally gone through Adderall withdrawals my self-I was on such a low dose for such a short time (a few months), that when I stopped taking it, I just felt fatigued and irritable for a few days.
But I have seen my husband when he doesn't have his Adderall - and he needs it, when he went to a special testing center for it, and the psychologist stated that he had the highest scores for ADHD she had ever seen - he can't function. He's exhausted, horribly irritable - and this is just in about 4 hours if he hasn't taken it. (He's supposed to take 6o mg./day, also, but only takes 4o mg. because of the fact it raises his blood pressure and makes his heart work harder). So I don't even want to think about him going without it "cold turkey".
In short, I don't think your girlfriend can just stop taking it without tapering off; it does sound to me that she need some sort of ADD medication; and it also seems she needs some sort of therapy because she stole medicine from you that she knew you needed, and didn't make the effort to be tested for ADD/ADHD herself if she felt she genuinely benefits from the medication.
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replied July 21st, 2009
Adderall Withdrawl 10 years of 120mg per day
I have been on Adderall since I was in middle school and I have been taking 30 mg 4 times a day since I was 16. I am now 26 years old and I am trying to come off Adderall. Does anybody know how long the withdrawl will last? I quit cold turkey 5 weeks ago and it has been 5 weeks of hell. I can't stand to be at work. All that I do is sleep. My depression is terrible. For some reason the only thing that gives me peace of mind is divorcing my wife???? Somebody help me!
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replied April 1st, 2011
HOLY HELL MAN! thats alot. And my family noticed a problem with me when I was taking like 60-75mg a day
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replied July 21st, 2009
I would not suggest quitting cold turkey. 120 mg a day is alot of adderall. is your dr aware of this dosage? If so, they should be the ones to step down your dosage safely.
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replied August 5th, 2009
AS someone who is attributing off of Adderall XR after 9 years of 60mgs/day, I STRONGLY suggest that you do this in conjunction with your doctor! I have been stepping down my dose slowly by month or bi-monthly and it is still horribly difficult.
Something that has really helped me is working with a great acupunturist. He put me on a homeopathic supplement called ATTEND.
Bottom line-don't do it alone, don't do it cold turkey and seriously, don't try to make any life altering decisions while you're doing it. Hang in there!
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replied September 30th, 2009
withdrawal
I have been sober off adderall for 36 days. For the past four years I abused the pills (generic, average: 60-80 milligrams per day, everyday)....I didn't think i could ever quit but I recently moved home from college, started my job and quit the adderall all at the same time. Needless to say it was extremely rough. But I did quit cold turkey without having any medical help. I can talk to my mom a little bit, but she doesn't understand AT ALL and gets freaked out when I mention things like "i'm having intense cravings today", etc. so I don't talk to her much about my withdrawal symptoms. Now that i'm 36 days in to being adderall free, I am feeling much better and mentally in a better place. For the first month it was hell. HELL. Each day I feel a tiny bit better but some days are better than others. The pills invade my dreams almost every night.

My question is, since I basically quit on my own and all at once, is there a stronger chance I won't make it and will relapse? I don't know much about the quitting/withdrawal process, but I do know that my addiction was strong and was ruining my life so finally I forced myself to stop taking the pills. Since I have quit, I haven't gone out with friends once nor have I had an urge to leave the house after coming home from work. I wouldn't answer my phone when loved ones called therefore they have stopped calling all together. I find it hard to talk about because i don't feel that anyone understands what i'm going through...but it definitely feels better when i do express how i'm feeling. thanks for listening Smile
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replied April 1st, 2011
I hear you missbee.....my story is very similar to yours. Except I relapsed this past week when i knew a neighbor was getting her script filled.

When I think about how I was when it got really bad.....and how I am as a person, that I wouldn't necessarily act the way I did when I was abusing this drug to reach that heavenly "euphoric" state -where you feel like none of your faults are noticable, you don't need anyone, from here its only up, etc

Yeah my family members have either completely shut me out or are in my face making 'meth' jokes like my sister in AA. tho I am not laughing yet. I hope to soon

I DO UNDERSTAND email me if you would like - though I did go to an AA meeting the other week its not the same. I would potentially like to meet one or a few ppl in person to talk specifically about adderall abuse
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replied November 21st, 2011
I just stopped cold turkey too, its been about two weeks and it is absolute hell!!! tell me it gets better! bc i feel like im grasping for hope and everything seems like the biggest task in the world. im a law school student and i was on it for about a year and a half. i started out on 30mg and increased to 60mg p/day. i was using it to study longer and concentrate, but i found that my grades actually suffered and i did not benefit. So, afterwords i just stopped it becasue i got too excited about everything and was all over the place. Anyway, when i read your post it made me feel alot better! Hang in there sista! thanks for the post
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replied December 28th, 2011
I was on adderall since i was 6, i am 29 now. I have been in and out of the hospital for amphetamine psychosises when i started using more and more of it, about 4 years ago. I was going for my law degree also! But, now I am court ordered to get off adderall. I have been off the drug for 3 months. I still have times when i worry about living without adderall and not being able to handle life. This happens almost daily, but i am reassured to not look to far in the future and that i am over worrying more easily now. Thats psychological addiction 101- i can't feel like i can live my life without adderall. But its starting to not be as long lasting feeling. The depression is becomming better, as long as i have something to do or look foreward to, or some positive affirmations to think about myself. The lethargy is getting better, but I still tend to sleep alot- 10 hours or so. I have decided not to become an attorney, due to my fathers advice(he's an attorney), and because i feel like i just couldn't do it and enjoy it without adderall. good luck-
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replied November 1st, 2009
in my experience it is extremely hard not to relapse. i have been prescribed adderall for the past seven years and have tried to take myself off several times because of wieght issues and one instance of seizures. i do not know what caused my seizure but it scared me enough to try to take myself off. i would reccommend some help in not only taking yourself off of it but in continuing not to go back to it. i lost all energy, focus, organization and subsequently my job after several months of going cold turkey and after several more months of not having a job, sleeping all day long, and wrongfully taking my depression out on my boyfriend who i am lucky enough to have love and support me i started taking the pill again in a lower dosage. i have found a new job and have gotten my perspective back. unfortunately, i have still not been able to prove to myself i could do this without the adderall. i applaude your efforts and wish you the best of lucks. i hope that life will once again be normal for you and that perhaps one day i will be free of the drug and be able to feel that way as well.sometimes i feel as though my doctors have made me a drug addict, i do not think i can function with the same energy i used to again without drugs and that is not something you ever want to have to say
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replied January 5th, 2012
I am reading your story and it sounds so familiar, and is so much like mine. That withdrawl of adderall is horendous, i have been off for almost 4 months now, and my energy and focus is not back to what it once was. I am taking phentermine for weight loss, and that is helping me stay engaged and focused. But I do feel like a drug addict, because I can't seem to function normally without drugs. Thanks for sharing.
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replied January 5th, 2012
I am reading your story and it sounds so familiar, and is so much like mine. That withdrawl of adderall is horendous, i have been off for almost 4 months now, and my energy and focus is not back to what it once was. I am taking phentermine for weight loss, and that is helping me stay engaged and focused. But I do feel like a drug addict, because I can't seem to function normally without drugs. Thanks for sharing.
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replied March 27th, 2012
But I do feel like a drug addict, because I can't seem to function normally without drugs.



This is the reason why so many people who actually HAVE ADD will not get diagnosed or take medication for it. I doubt that most people actually know the difference between "addiction" and "dependency". When you run out of your script before the month is out, if your looking for ways to get ahold of the drug outside of the medical profession, if you are constantly researching ways to convince your doctor that your current meds and/or doseage are not working for you... ADDICT. If your life was a living hell: substance-less relationships, poor grades in school no matter how hard you tried, multiple jobs in a short period of time, maybe even a crap load of debt due to impulsive spending, and you sought professional help and with the write doseage are starting to see that you as a human being are not the reason for your faults and maybe starting to make some progress for the first time in years: DEPENDANT. There are millions of people who take medication for thousands of different ailments so that they can live. Would you tell a 65 year old man that takes blood pressure medication that he is an addict because he cannot function normally without drugs? Too many people are being diagnosed with ADD simply because they feel that they cannot live up to the standards that are set in modern society. I would love to know how many people who take Adderall for "energy and focus" are employed in goal-oriented professions, where maybe they could benefit financially if they found a way to do "just a little more" or maybe working parents who need to be able to get up in the morning, see the kids to school, go to work, make dinner, take little Johnny to soccer practice or litlle Suzy to ballet lessons... I think we would be truely amazed at the answers... To all of the people who actually have ADD, do not let uneducated fools make you feel guilty about taking a medication that vastly improves your quality of life. To all those who seek professional help for their problems, do not be discouraged just because there are a few "bad apples" in the bunch who seek a diagnosis and prescrition so that they can get the edge that they could not find on their own. This is a real disease, it doesn't have to go unchecked....
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replied March 27th, 2012
P.S. To those who are trying to eliminate adderall from their lives, I ask you this: Why did you seek the diagnosis in the first place? Unless taking the medication had an adverse effect on your health or was just not working, why would you want to stop taking it? Unfortuneatly, ADD does not go away with medication or any other kind of methods. It can only be managed ie: hypothyroidism. Maybe you just didn't have ADD at all... maybe college is over and you realize that it's going to be a nightmare to "cop" outside of the university setting... Time for some DEEP personal reflection...
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replied November 20th, 2009
BPII
I have been on adderall for about 5 years now. I went to a new pdoc and we were talking about my up's and down's while being on adderall. He said it didn't sound that I had add. He thought I had bipolar II with a anxiety issue. I've gotten on lamictal(going on 2 months) and i feel better. I have gotten off adderall for about 3 day's but I'm been tired(withdrawal). I notice the only time i can't focus is when I'm have anxiety. I want to wait until my adderall withdrawal symptons are gone to mess with the anxiety. They could be from the symptoms. Has anyone ever heard of BPII instead of ADD?
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replied November 29th, 2009
You can know
Know of a friend who is on bi-polar meds that runs up to $1,000 a month!!! Topamax, Seroquel, even Adderall ($160 per month habit) don't make sense to me. I know of a friend who detoxed from metadone (7 years on it). He had to detox because his wife cut him off from her insurance.
It was a $260 per month habit. Like it or not, he couldn't keep a job, let alone rent, so he had to cold turkey anyways. During this time, I build him up with
necessary vitamins esp. the B's & C's, plus multi-vitm.
He felt the vitamins were helping, and when he had to cold turkey, it was not as bad as he had thought.
Currently, my son is on Adderall (10mg x 2 a day) at $25 per month. At least that is more reasonable.
Don't just because insurance is paying, people should take for granted and let the pharmaciautical take advantage and charge an arm and a leg for meds./help.
We shouldn't let them tear the country up!!! People need
to be freedom fighters and activist for worthy cause.
Need to question the drug companies, no one should be paying more than $50 a month worth of drug, nor allow serious dependency w/o you having the control!!!
You were born free, to be IN CHARGE! To have a say and be treated with upmost respect and honor. Likewise, do to others as you would others do unto you....
Romans8:37
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replied December 2nd, 2009
Developed in India, yoga is a spiritual practice that has been evolving for the last 5,000 years or so. The original yogis were reacting, in part, to India's ancient Vedic religion, which emphasized rituals. The yogis wanted a direct spiritual experience -- one on one -- not symbolic ritual. So they developed yoga.Yoga means "union" in Sanskrit, the classical language of India.
According to the yogis, true happiness, liberation and enlightenment comes from union with the divine consciousness known as Brahman, or with Atman, the transcendent Self. The various yoga practices are a methodology for reaching that goal.
In hatha yoga, for example, postures and breathing exercises help purify the mind, body and spirit so the yogi can attain union.
Pranayama breathing exercises help clear the nadis, or channels, that carry prana the universal life force, allowing prana to flow freely. When the channels are clear and the last block at the base of the spine has been
opened, Kundalini rises through the spine, through the central channel called the sushumna-nadi, and joins the crown chakra. According to the tradition, the release of Kundalini leads to enlightenment and union.
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replied December 9th, 2009
Experienced User
I also was on adderall, 20mgs 3 times daily (so 60mg). After awhile I kinda started only taking 2 a day, I guess because I just couldn't remember to take 'em-go figure!! Another interesting piece of info. that seems to contradict the side effects of quitting is that when I took too much I became very sleepy! Anywhoo, I got pregnant and just quit under doctors orders. My only side effect was extreme sleepiness for a few days!!

My opinion is to absolutely NOT let your girlfriend have access to your med's!!!!!!!! It is funny (not haha funny) how people that don't need them go crazy for 'em and become very dramatic when they don't get 'em, or at least that's my experience! I would not hesitate to tell your girlfriend to go to the doctor if she is convinced she NEEDS them. I am not a doctor so please consult with yours before taking any advice I may have given. Good luck!
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replied December 22nd, 2009
Adderall usage: quit or accept?
Its interesting to me how we all carry some shame, and/or guilt about taking adderrall.
Maybe its just fear. I too have taken it for about 5 yrs, off and on- but can't seem to quit= get thru the withdrawal. I feel pretty bad without it. Why should I, my doc reminds me that it really helps me. I have ADD, and symptoms of fatigue, like chronic fatigue or epstien barr, and the adderall just gets me thru the day. Keeps me alive. motivated. not depreesed. (I take 20 mg xr, and sometimes take a reg 10 if I am going out at night).
SO, my question is, "Is it bad for us to take this med long term?". I mean, what is happening to our brain waves, nervous system, organs, etc. I am over 50 yrs old, and I have mixed feelings- like thank God for this drug, and then I also feel like phishfood in that I aspire to feel "normal" without the drug, but don't see much hope. I mean, I can't imagine getting thru life without it. thanks for listening, and any sugestions much appreciated!
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replied March 27th, 2012
You should have NO SHAME WHAT-SO-EVER, my friend. I too suffer from severe ADD and CFS; diagnosed about 3 years ago. I made the foolish decision to try life without my meds after about 18 months post-diagnosis firmly believing: "I made it 30 years without meds, why should I let a drug dictate my life?" Never thought about the reason why I was diagnosed in the first place: just listened to family members and other menatal "experts" who preached the "evils of psychiatric drugs." The problem with mental disorders is that there are no subjective tests to confirm or deny the presence of disease like there are for physical diseases ie: high blood pressure, thyroid disorders, etc. Just because we won't die (in the physical sense) without our meds doesnot mean that we do not need them. If you were diagnosed with a disorder, and the meds are helping you make great strides in your life despite that disorder, why shouldn't you continue taking them? Isn't quality of life just as important as actual life? Unfortuneatly, it took me 3 long months to come to that conclusion. Please don't do that to yourself... PEACE and LOVE
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replied December 27th, 2009
The truth...could this be an addiction?
I have been taking the generic for adderal on/off for one year. I am prescribed 30mg/day but many times find myself taking more like 50/60mg. Christmas day, I stopped and found myself almost unable to get out of bed. Today is the 3rd day of not taking these meds. It is 8pm and I woke up a hour ago. I am feeling better, yet, my right side (maybe liver or appendix involvement)is extremely soar with mostly rebound pain. I have a headache that is being relieved with Excedrin (the caffeine) is helping here. I read a reply that made a lot of sense. I know that my body is finding itself very soar by the end of the day when I am taking the dexadrine. I walk like an old lady. A good point: I am in such a state of tension throughout the day that it certainly effects my muscles and tendons...leaving me to feel so tender throughout my body. I actually find myself with less energy, though, at first there is a kick of energy but then I crash. This stuff is really not good and I am thinking it through to dump the rest of the prescription. If I can't...then maybe my addictions are getting the best of me...and in recovery ONLY THE TRUTH WILL SET US FREE! Thanks for this forum.
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replied March 27th, 2012
If you cannot stay within the limits of your script, then yes, you need to stop. That is ADDICTION!!!!
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replied January 26th, 2010
I've been taking Adderall off and on for three years now, first starting with 20 mg. Then to 30, 40 and 60. Someone suggested I insufflate it to get more out of it so I did. That was the day I became addicted. It was a roller coaster of worrying how I was going to get it if I ran out, going to other doctors, buying it off the internet. I messed my life up. I went off of it for eight months and I was exhausted the whole time so I went back to it and quickly back up to 120 mgs a day. Now doctors are on to me, insurance co is rejecting me, I'm going periods without it and I am once again a mess. My husband follows my every move and he is on to everything. I feel like I can't live without it. I seriously can't. I wish a dr would understand and let me wean off from the large dose I am accustomed to, but no doctor will do that. He will just cut you off. This really stinks!
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replied February 16th, 2010
First of all;I'd reconsider any thought of entertaining any sort of serious relationship to someone, who stole [anything] from me. If there is no honesty as the basis of a relationship; it is only doomed to fail.Secondly, her addiction is not YOUR problem; you don't own it-its HER problem. If you're addicted to adderall; than it wasn't the correct medication for you from the beginning or you've abused it in some manner. I had been on 60+mg's of adderall for 2 years;in December of 2009, I found myself unable to buy adderall[overseas] so my doc perscribed 15/20 mg's of dexedrine/day. There was a slight feeling of fatique after 4/5 hours and it was, challenging-to function on task for over 2 hours but that was all. When I returned to the states, I had run out of the dexedrine, I have been been without any medication for my ADD now for 3 weeks. My side effects? Nothing besides the original reason that I was proscribed adderall in the first place[inability to focus]. I have not been exhausted, depressed, nor "craving" the drug as it[adderall] did nothing for me in terms of the effects that I've heard other people describe.
I really feel that "Addiction" must be more a question of personality/body chemistry than the drug, itself.
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replied February 21st, 2010
ADD, Adderall, Rage, Dosage, Addiction, libido,
I have been on Adderall for 1 month 30mg XR and It's the first ADD med I've ever taken. But I can totally see how you could become addicted, it's an intensely aware sort of feeling.
At first it was super and I loved being able to focus for the first time in a long time. But then something strange happened, I began noticing very strong feelings surfacing that I had repressed, nearly a decade ago. I began to intensely hate my wife and would lay awake at night grinding my teeth with a kind of rage I haven't felt since I was a teenager! It was disturbing, but when the rage is yours you become protective of it. I stopped taking the med and talked to my doctor, he said, "I have no idea why you're so angry, but it is my conclusion that with this new information, your reaction is too dangerous to continue with this drug". Also I thought Adderall was supposed to increase libido. People touching me was like nails on a chalkboard.
has anyone else experienced this?
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Users who thank BigRookie for this post: susanfrasier  susanfrasier 

replied March 6th, 2010
Adderall is a deadly Barbiturate that destroys lives.
Adderall. Is it worth it folks? You have A.D.D. but need to take a barbiturate also in the class of drugs known as sedative-hypnotics. It's insane. Then there's the addiction! Do NOT get on this drug, and for crying out loud don't let your girlfriend have access to it, or make excuses that she might have "the same thing" you do. This drug should be banned, and at least Canada has some sense, unlike the USA.. but then again the doctors here and pharmacies, and drug companies are making millions if not billions off of this drug. Get the picture. There are natural ways to heal yourself, research these methods. No pill is going to fix anything.
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replied September 16th, 2011
RIGHT ON!! It is not worth it! I was told by so many different American doctors to take this med starting when I was 18. Little did I know that I'd be hooked, taking it for ten years, fully addicted, dependent and strung out. It does more harm than it does good!
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replied January 4th, 2012
Canada has not banned it so do some research before you post.
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