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Aspirin & Breast Cancer Survival

March 28th, 2010 by Dr. Robert Wascher

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ASPIRIN & BREAST CANCER SURVIVAL

Breast cancer tumors, like many other types of cancer, produce increased amounts of chemicals called prostaglandins. As with many other types of cancer, prostaglandins are thought to play an important role in the growth and spread of breast cancer.

Aspirin belongs to a class of drugs known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Like other NSAIDs, aspirin is able to block the activity of the prostaglandin-producing enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX). Moreover, previous research has indicated that, in addition to decreasing prostaglandin production in the body, aspirin also reduces the levels of estrogen in the body (approximately 90 percent of breast cancers are stimulated to grow in the presence of estrogen).

Previous research on aspirin as a breast cancer prevention drug has resulted in contradictory findings (although aspirin and other NSAIDs have clearly been shown to reduce the incidence of colorectal polyps and colorectal cancer, and other cancers as well). However, a newly published study, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, adds weight to prior evidence that the regular intake of aspirin may significantly decrease the risk of breast cancer recurrence, and the risk of death due to recurrent breast cancer.

The enormous Nurses Health Study is a prospective public health research study that began in 1976 with more than 120,000 female nurses in the United States. Every 2 years, this huge cohort of women completes detailed personal questionnaires regarding diet and lifestyle factors related to cardiovascular disease and cancer. Between 1976 and 2002, more than 4,000 nurses participating in this study were newly diagnosed with breast cancer. The researchers conducting this landmark study then analyzed the incidence of breast cancer recurrence, and the risk of death, among these 4,164 breast cancer patients as a function of their aspirin intake. (Other cancer-associated diet and lifestyle risk factors were also analyzed, as well.)

In this huge prospective public health trial, regular aspirin intake was found to significantly reduce the risk of death due to breast cancer. Taking aspirin 2 to 5 times per week was associated with a 71 percent reduction in the relative risk of death due to breast cancer, while 6 to 7 days of aspirin use per week was associated with a 64 percent reduction in the relative risk of cancer-associated death. Importantly, this apparent aspirin-associated reduction in the risk of death due to breast cancer recurrence was observed in women with both early-stage and more advanced breast cancers, in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women, in both obese and non-obese women, and in women with estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant tumors.

While this studys primary weakness is that (like most epidemiological studies) the collected data was primarily based upon patient questionnaires, the Nurses Health Study continues to be a carefully conducted prospective study with very stringent data quality controls in place.

To summarize the important findings of this study: Among women previously diagnosed with breast cancer, taking aspirin for 2 or more days per week was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of both breast cancer recurrence and death due to breast cancer. (As always, I recommend that you discuss the potential risks and benefits of regularly taking aspirin, or any other new medication, with your doctor before making such changes.)

To learn more about the potential role of NSAIDs in cancer risk reduction, look for the publication of my new landmark book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, in the spring/summer of this year.

Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author

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Tags: Breast Cancer, breast, Cancer, estrogen, breast cancer prevention, anti-inflammatory, Oncology, amounts, Diet, medications, aspirin use, benefits of, medication, addition, surgery, weight, polyps, female, tumors, breast cancer prevention diet


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